Abercrombie & Fitch Accused of Discrimination

(This post written by Rick Dacri on September 10, 2013)

Some companies just don’t get it.

A federal judge in California ruled last week that Abercrombie & Fitch discriminated against a Muslim employee on religious grounds, according to the EEOC.

The employee, a Muslim woman, was asked to wear head scarves in the colors of her store when she began working there. She complied, but four months later was told her head scarf violated the dress code, known as the “Look Policy” and that she would need to remove it at work. She refused and was terminated. The judge stated that her termination violated Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which bars religious discrimination and mandates that employers accommodate religious practices unless they impose “undue hardship” on the company.

Abercrombie stated that it doesn’t discriminate based on religion and grants “religious accommodations when reasonable.”

Previously they were accused of committing religious discrimination for not hiring a Muslim applicant who was wearing a head scarf during her interview and in another suit paid a $40 million settlement to minority and female plaintiffs who accused the retailer of race and gender discrimination.

Want to add to this story. Let us know in the comments or send an email to Rick Dacri at rick@dacri.com.

If you like this post, you may want to read these:

  1. EEOC Reports Nearly 100,000 Job Discrimination Charges
  2. Discrimination Claims: Seven Ways to Effectively Protect Your Company

 

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1 Comment

Filed under Compliance

One response to “Abercrombie & Fitch Accused of Discrimination

  1. Pingback: How The Civil Rights Act Changed the Modern Workplace | Uncomplicating Management

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