5 Frequent and Costly Hiring Mistakes

internet_recruitment_job_interview_362210302(This article, written by Rick Dacri, was published in the October JobsInTheUS newsletter)

When recruiting, finding the right candidate is always difficult. What makes it harder, are simple and costly mistakes. Here are five frequent faux pas:

1. Looking and Not Knowing

Managers often start the search process without fully understanding what they are looking for in a new hire. Simply replicating the person who previously held the position or blindly following a job description is not sufficient. Circumstances and needs change. Profile your ideal candidate. Factor in what you need today and tomorrow. Understand who will be successful and who will not. Beyond education, training and experience, consider traits and fit.

2. Searching and Not Attracting

Posting a job on a job board or internet site will generate an avalanche of resumes, but will not necessarily land you the ideal candidate. In fact, this approach could eliminate many potentially good candidates who are not actively looking and may not be aware of your search for a new candidate.

Don’t forget about the candidates who are currently working and not looking. With the development of a strong recruitment brand, candidates, active and passive, who share your beliefs and values, will be attracted to your company like a magnet. Rather than you looking for them, they will be seeking you out.

3. Selling and Not Buying

In the job interview, managers are often too quick to sell the job, company and benefits before they know what they are buying. Stop talking. Ask questions, listen and evaluate. See if they are the correct fit  for the job and your company. Once you know you have the right candidate, then you can begin the sell. If the candidate is wrong, there is no need to waste your time or theirs. Thank them and send them off.

4. Giving and Not Negotiating

When it comes time for the offer, owners too often have a one size fits all job offer in their pocket. Candidates expect to negotiate, whether it’s about pay, benefits or time off. Be prepared for the give and take of a real negotiation to ensure getting a “yes” to your offer.

5. Accepting and Not Verifying

“Trust, but verify” should be practiced in all recruitment initiatives. Too often, managers accept what’s on a resume or what a candidate says as fact. Thorough, probing reference and background checks are an essential part of all job searches.

By avoiding these miscues, you are better positioned to land the best candidate for the job.

Need help with developing an effective recruitment program? Contact Dacri & Associates.

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