Tag Archives: Dacri

Municipalities: The Magnet That Draws Candidates to You Creating a Positive Recruitment Brand

 

MTCMA

(This article was written by Rick Dacri and published in the March 2016 MTCMA Newsletter)

Why is it that some towns have a steady stream of quality individuals who want to work for them? In large part, these towns have created and fostered a positive brand. When communities find it impossible to fill open positions or get volunteers to step forward, it is likely a result of having a negative brand.

So what is a recruitment brand? Quite simply, it is the magnet that draws candidates to you. It’s the message you convey about what it is like to work for your town. Every organization has a brand, whether you know it or not. You communicate it every day to and through your employees, the actions you and they take or don’t take, the words spoken or the silence delivered, and even through your physical appearance. Your brand is communicated through your values, beliefs, and your core mission and ideally, from a recruitment standpoint, your brand sends a strong and loud message out to the community that “you’re a great place to work.” Continue reading

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Filed under city manager, Recruitment, Uncategorized

Municipalities: Top 10 Tips To Ensure the Board & Manager Maintain a Strong & Effective Working Relationship

UnknownPost by Rick Dacri. Originally published in the City & Town Magazine of the New Hampshire Municipal Association, May/June 2015

  1. Establish a clear, mutually agreed upon mission for the town and define values from which to operate. Take the time to discuss vision, strategy and policy. If your focus is simply surviving today, you’ll likely stagnate. Effective boards understand the importance of strategic planning as a means to steer the organization.
  2. Identify clear, annual goals and needs along with a time frame to complete. Develop a vision for your community. Dream big and move forward, one step at a time.
  3. Establishment a clear division of responsibilities and accountabilities for the board and manager. Be specific about boundaries and control. Governance must be clearly delineated and understood. You can only have one town manager at a time.
  4. Establish a forum for ongoing open communications and planning. Build open discussions into your calendar. Set up formal times to meet, both formally and informally with the manager to maintain focus and to nurture the relationship.
  5. Establish methods to resolve conflict in a respectful, open and honest manner. Conflict will occur. Set up a process to address it, and, if that doesn’t work, bring in outside professional help.
  6. Establish priorities with the understanding that they must be reviewed on an ongoing basis since the town’s challenges are ever changing. We live in a rapidly evolving environment. The board and manager must be nimble. The strategic planning process helps to anticipate the expected challenges, threats and opportunities before they emerge, but external and internal changes can occur that will change the picture.
  7. Develop methods to establish trust and support, where everyone adheres to the plan and each of you “has each other’s back.” Trust is a critical element in any healthy relationship. Without it, things fail. Work to continuously build trust and get help when repair is required.
  8. Develop and implement an effective annual performance evaluation system that is an ongoing process. There should be no surprises in annual evaluation if communication has been healthy, ongoing and honest. No business relationship can occur without clear accountability standards. A performance evaluation can be an excellent tool for this. Establish a formal process. Provide each board member an opportunity to contribute. Focus on the future and avoid creating a “report card” system. And encourage informal feedback throughout the year.
  9. Develop a process to bring newly elected board members up-to-date on what has been established and agreed upon amongst the current board and manager. Board orientations bring new members up to speed quickly, allowing them to make an immediate contribution.
  10. Create a board of selectmen self-assessment. This is a tool designed to help clarify roles and responsibilities, assess board performance, seek ways to improve and plan for the future. Outside professionals are often engaged to help boards develop such a mechanism.

Other Posts You Might Like:

  1. How to do Quality Manager Evaluations
  2. Recruitment: Landing Your Next Manager
  3. Succession Planning in Municipalities Assure Steady Flow of Talent

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Filed under ICMA, Leadership, municipality

Online Accelerated Supervisory Development Program–May 13

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Last year I introduced the Accelerated Supervisory Development Program. I conducted two programs and 24 individuals signed up and successfully completed it. Since then I have been asked when I was going to offer the program again. Well, mark your calendars. A new program is scheduled to begin on May 13, 2015.

This training program is specifically designed for small companies with only a few managers or companies that want to quickly provide training for a single manager or two. I call it

 Rick Dacri’s Uncomplicating Management

Accelerated Supervisory Development Program.

Here’s what some of the “graduates” said about recent programs:

Great class. Rick cleared up issues on employee problems.”

Chris Davidson, Supervisor, Paras Electric

 

“Rick Dacri provided me a template with which I can elevate the performance of my crew, reward top performers, and address the needs of those not yet reaching their potential.”

Kevin Snow, Supervisor, Groveland Municipal Light Department

 

“Just the chapter/lesson on legal issues of hiring and terminations and drug testing do’s and don’ts are worth its weight to the average employer who doesn’t deal with this on a regular basis. Lots of info packed into a very painless time frame.”

Mark Dufoe, Operations Manager, Kennebunk Light & Power District

In five short weeks, you or your supervisors will:

  • Enhance their skills as a manager
  • Increase their ability to motivate and engage their people to deliver outstanding results
  • Know how to attract, hire and retain exceptional talent
  • Delegate and make better decisions
  • Inspire, coach and mentor their people, creating enthusiasm, clarity and increased effectiveness
  • Listen and communicate better, resulting in open and honest dialogue
  • Confront problem employees, resolve tough issues, including attitude, performance and behavior
  • Provide honest feedback, praise and recognition
  • Understand and operate within the law, without fear of lawsuits

The program includes 5 regularly scheduled training sessions, one-on-one coaching with me, training materials, my book, and more.

 Interested? Follow this link and read all about it and register. With a starting date of May 13, this program is the perfect way to develop the skills and effectiveness of your management team!

To learn more or to enroll, click Accelerated Supervisory Development Program or call me, Rick Dacri at 207-229-5954 or email me ar rick@dacri.com.

Enrollment is limited, so sign up now.

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Filed under careers, Leadership, Management

Recruitment: Finding Perfect Candidates

(Post by Rick Dacri, November 7, 2014)hiring

When recruiting a new executive, it is important to know where to find the best candidates. In previous newsletters and in my book Uncomplicating Management, I have covered the recruitment process in detail, but this month I want to discuss where to source great candidates.his month I want to discuss where to source great candidates.

Just today, a Trustee of a utility board I know called me about her frustration in generating good quality candidates for her open General Manager position. She had placed ads on association websites, Indeed and Monster expecting to be overwhelmed with super resumes. It didn’t happen. While her efforts were good first steps, particularly advertising on professional sites, her focus had excluded a huge population of excellent candidates-those individuals who are not looking for a job but who might make ideal candidates. Only those who are looking for a job read these ads.

I recently completed an executive search for a General Manager of a public utility and I am currently recruiting a City Manager for a medium size community. While I too placed some very targeted ads on industry specific sites, I focused primarily on a vast network of managers who are currently doing a similar job, and who may either know of managers who would fit this open position or who may be interested in learning more about it for themselves. These managers would never have seen these recruitment ads, but might be interested in making a move for the right opportunity. By networking with literally hundreds of managers (yes, hundreds), I was able to identify several well-qualified candidates who could make an immediate contribution upon hire. While this process requires having an existing network to tap and the time required to speak to these people (emails do not work), the benefits of this approach make it a must strategy.

Adding this crucial networking piece ensures you get better candidates and a better hire. Remember, successful fishermen know where the fish are biting. Successful recruiters do the same.

If you need help with your recruitment needs, give me a call at 207-967-0837.

Other Posts You Might Like:

  1. Recruitment: Why Job Searches Fail
  2. Recruitment: The 5 Pillars of a Strong Brand
  3. Recruitment: Getting a “Yes” to Every Job Offer

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Filed under Help Wanted, Job Search, Recruitment

LinkedIn Gets Burned with Overtime Violations

UnknownPosted by Rick Dacri, August 26, 2014

Wage and hour violations are easy to commit, tough to mitigate, and can cost you a bundle. Ask LinkedIn. The Department of Labor has ordered them to pay nearly $6 Million in overtime-back wages and liquidated damages to 359 former and current nonexempt employees. The violation? Not having the right tools in place for some employees and their managers to properly track their hours. In other words, they probably didn’t record the hours the employees worked and didn’t pay them overtime for any hours worked over 40. Simple stuff, but areas where supervisors frequently get sloppy, employees get angry for not getting paid and companies get burned.

As part of the settlement, LinkedIn also agreed to do the following:

  1. Provide compliance training and distribute its policy prohibiting off the clock work to all nonexempt employees and their managers;
  2. Meet with the managers of the current affected employees to remind them that overtime work must be recorded and paid; and
  3. Remind employees of LinkedIn’s policy prohibiting retaliation against any employee who raises concerns about workplace issues.

My advice: I strongly recommend that you review your current pay practices, not just your policy. Talk to your supervisors and managers to make sure they are fully complying with the law. Sometimes, supervisors, in an effort to comply with no overtime policies and to stay within their budgets, improperly enforce the policy and commit infractions.

The Department of Labor is vigilant in monitoring and enforcing wage and hour violations. Their penalties are steep. Call me if you need assistance in ensuring you’re fully complaint.

Other similar posts by Rick Dacri that you may find helpful:

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Filed under Compensation, Compliance, Management

Minimum Wage: Massachusetts Ups Rate

Post by Rick Dacri, June 28, 2014

Massachusetts Governor Patrick signed legislation increasing the states minimum wage.  The state’s minimum wage is currently at $8.00 per hour and will increase to $9.00 per hour as of January 1, 2015; $10.00 per hour, effective January 1, 2016; and $11.00 per hour as of January 1, 2017.  Wages for tipped employees will also be phased in over time, increasing from $2.63 per hour currently to $3.00 per hour on January 1, 2015; $3.35 per hour on January 1, 2016; and $3.75 per hour on January 1, 2017.

You should begin the process of reviewing your wage structure in order assess any potential impact on your organization.

If you need assistance, give me a call.

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Filed under Compensation, Compliance, Uncategorized

Maine Mandates Sexual Harassment Training

hammer1(Post by Rick Dacri, June 16, 2014)

Maine is one of three states nationally that mandates sexual harassment training for all their employees (California and Connecticut are the other two). Many other states, like Massachusetts, strongly encourage it.

Under Maine law, employers with at least 15 employees must conduct training for all its new employees within one year of their start date. Additional training for supervisors and managers is required within one year of becoming a supervisor or manager.

Training for all employees must include:

  1. notice that sexual harassment is illegal
  2. a definition of sexual harassment
  3. a description of sexual harassment utilizing examples
  4. a description of any internal compliant process available
  5. a description of the Maine Human Rights Commission complaint process
  6. a statement that any complainant will be protected against retaliation

Supervisory training must include everything that is included in the employee training plus clarification of the supervisor’s responsibilities and methods for prevention and correcting sexual harassment.

While Maine only requires that initial training, I have found that those organizations that regularly (usually annually) train and educate their managers and employees rarely have harassment claims and enjoy a respectful and productive workforce.

Call me if you would like to learn more about training and your responsibilities under the law and if you would like to schedule training for your company. For a description of my online supervisory training program, click Training.

Incidentally, the Maine Human Rights Commission has included Rick Dacri on their “Sexual Harassment Trainers Referral List.”

Other posts you may want to read:

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Filed under Compliance, Management