Tag Archives: independent contractors

Workplace Trends & How Employers Must Respond

Screen Shot 2015-08-18 at 11.23.43 AMThree critical trends are emerging in today’s workplace: 1) the traditional full-time, 40 hour worker is being replaced by part-timers, Independent Contractors and gig-workers; 2) the ability to attract and retain workers is going to require different strategies and those employed in the past; and 3) workforce loyalty has a new look.

Rick Dacri & David Ciullo discuss these trends and how employers should respond in this Mind Your Own Business TV interview with Debi Davis.

To view the interview, click Workforce Trends.

Post by Rick Dacri, August 18, 2015.

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Filed under Economy, Leadership

7 Recruitment Trends in 2015

(Post by Rick Dacri, April 1, 2015)

hiringEmployers are hiring again and the competition for talent is getting fierce. As I view the marketplace, I am seeing 7 recruitment trends emerging:
1. Differentiation is critical: employers are developing and promoting their recruitment brands as a means of attracting candidates. Without one and you’ll remain a best kept secret.
2. Pay is king: the competition for the top talent is intense and the biggest obstacle to landing the best is pay. Employers are evaluating their pay systems and upping their wages in critical positions.
3. Traditional advertising is out: Employers are attracting candidates through rich referral programs, company career sites, and social media. You need to know where your candidates hang out and focus your efforts there. Target recruiting is the best.
4. Passive candidates are coveted: Employers want candidates who are working and who are likely not even aware you have openings. Recruiters must be able to find them. This is the key to my recruitment success finding executives.
5. Older workers offer experience and stability: Baby boomers are not leaving the workplace as quickly as expected and employers are beginning to recognize their value. More employers are developing programs and benefits to attract and retain these generational workers.
6. Gig workers fill voids: Independent contractors, project workers and part time workers are filling in where needed. I discussed this just-in-time workplace in my book Uncomplicating Management in 2009. Many thought I was wrong. I wasn’t.
7. Retention is your best recruitment tool: if they don’t leave, you don’t have to replace them. Sometimes all you need is a strong retention program to solve your recruitment problem. Focus on creating a great place to work and people will stay…and if you need more workers, the word will get out and people will be attracted to you (that’s a big part of brand differentiation).
Employers who have a comprehensive recruitment program and a positive work environment, will be at a competitive advantage.

Others posts you might like:

 

 

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What’s An Employee? Incorrect Definitions Are Costly

images(Post by Rick Dacri, May 10, 2014)

Every morning I pour a cup of coffee, grab the newspaper, and turn directly to the sports page. It’s my way of relaxing before I have to think about work. Unfortunately, not lately.

Earlier this year, I read about harassment and bullying within the Miami Dolphin’s team; later that the NFL is grappling with how they’ll handle openly gay players; and now the NLRB has determined that the Northwestern University football players can unionize. It’s getting to the point that there is no escape from work. The sports page is becoming the new edition of LexisNexis.

I am not going to address any of these three issues directly today. But the NLRB’s decision implies that the players are “employees” and that’s a good segue to what I want to discuss with you: what is an employee? This sounds basic, but it isn’t, and incorrectly defining someone as NOT an employee can have significant consequences to you and your company. Let me explain.

First a definition: “An employee is a person who works in the service of another under express or implied contract for hire, under which the employer has the right to control details of work performance” (Black’s Law Dictionary). That’s clear until you understand there are some broad exceptions to that definition created by the U.S. Department of Labor. Independent contractors and student interns are not employees. Still with me? OK, here it comes.

Independent contractors are not employees and therefore, under the law, employers who engage them have no obligation to withhold taxes or offer benefits (workers comp, unemployment comp and the usual holidays, etc.). But where you can get into trouble is when the IRS, or the Department of Labor or the state views this Independent Contractor as an employee. Now you’re in trouble.

The general rule is that an individual is an independent contractor “if Continue reading

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Workforce Predictions and Trends for 2013 (Audio Podcast)

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In a lively, give and take radio interview on WLOB’s Mind Your Own Business, I give my workforce predictions for 2013. In addition, I discuss what the future workforce will look like, predict where unemployment will be at the end of the year, discuss how employers should address  social media, why turnover in many companies will begin to increase and much more. Listen in and give me your thoughts in the comment section below.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

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January 13, 2013 · 10:58 AM

2012 Checklist for People Management

Annual physicals are a must for good long-term health. The same applies to your organization’s people management. To start the year off right, here is your checklist:

  1. Are your employees coming to work everyday, being productive, making few mistakes,  rarely getting hurt, and always willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done right?
  2. Are your policies, systems, and procedures consistently being applied and compliant with state and federal employment laws?
  3. Have you reviewed your employee handbook and policy manuals? Do your managers know what’s in it and are they following it?
  4. Do  your supervisors have the skills and knowledge to confidently confront  most workforce issues?
  5. Are you properly classifying your employees as exempt or non-exempt? Have you checked all independent contractors?
  6. Have you reviewed your workers’ compensation program? Are injured employees returning to work quickly? Do you have up-to-date loss runs? Is your experience modification rating less than 1.0? Are open claims being closed?
  7. Have  you provided annual sexual harassment prevention training for managers and employees? Have you distributed your policy to all employees? Do employees understand that harassment will never be tolerated? Do supervisors  understand their responsibilities? Are complaints being properly and promptly investigated?
  8. Is  your performance management program working? Are you seeing an improvement  in employee’s performance? Are employee goals being met? Are supervisors trained to give appraisals? Are employees educated to receive appraisals?
  9. Are you growing and developing your people? Are training programs in place?  Are skills being developed? Are employees being coached? Is performance  improving?
  10. Are  you successfully recruiting star performers? Do you have a recruitment brand that draws candidates to your door?
  11. Are your compensation programs working? Are you getting value for your payroll  dollars?   Are your wages competitive with the market?
  12. Do  your employees know what is expected of them? Do you have clear accountability systems in place? Is performance consistently improving?
  13. Are you confident that your employees are doing the right things when dealing  with your customers?
  14. Are you retaining your best people? Do you have a plan in place to ensure that your stars will not be poached by outside recruiters?
  15. Have you put in place succession plans in case you lose a key employee?
  16. Are  you confident that things will be better this year than they were last year?

Fostering an environment where employees are “willing to give their all” to guarantee the success of your organization is paramount.  When managers take care of their employees and inspire them and when employees believe in their boss and their organizations, then success is guaranteed. This is pragmatic, uncomplicated, bottom line approach to business and the right medicine for 2012 and beyond.

 

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Filed under Employee Relations, Leadership, Management

Navigating The Post Recession Workplace

The post-recession workplace will look different from what we have seen before and its make-up will pose tremendous challenges to managers. How managers address them will determine their success or failure in this new emerging economy.

As employers spring from this painful recession, they will be faced with significant workforce tests including the need to keep labor costs low, pressures to increase productivity further, a battered and disengaged employee population, and government agencies scrutinizing employers who seek cost savings at the expense of workers, while avoiding their tax obligations. Employers must prepare now for this new emerging workforce.

Consistent with what we have seen in past recessions, the temporary employment industry is a leading indicator of the current economic conditions and a reliable predictor of future employment trends. Cautious employers hire temps first, hedging their bets on the recovery, realizing that if a downturn occurs it is easier to lay off these workers. This year is no different. Temporary staffing agencies report that business is strong as employers once again turn to “temps” before hiring full-time workers. However, unlike previous post recession periods, this year we can expect to see two new trends evolving.

Read rest of article at http://www.dacri.com/art_emerging_post_r_workplace.html

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Filed under Compliance, Economy, Leadership, Management

New Workplace Emerging

A new workplace of the future is taking shape. The post-recession workplace is beginning to look very different from what we have seen before and its make-up will pose tremendous challenges for managers. How managers address them will determine their success or failure in this new emerging economy.

 As employers spring from this painful recession, they will be faced with significant workforce tests including the need to keep labor costs low, pressures to increase productivity further, a battered and disengaged employee population, and government agencies scrutinizing employers who seek cost savings at the expense of workers. Employers must prepare now for this new emerging workforce.

 As we have seen in past recessions, the temporary employment industry is a leading indicator of the current economic conditions and a reliable predictor of future employment trends. Cautious employers hire temps first, hedging their bets on the recovery, realizing that if a downturn occurs it is easier to lay off these workers. This year will be no different. Temporary staffing agencies report that business is strong as employers once again turn to “temps” before hiring full-time workers. However, don’t expect a rush to convert temps to permanent employees. In this new economy, employers will begin to embrace a new “just-in-time” labor force made up of temps, independent contractors and “per diems.” Employers want a flexible workforce and many believe a core workforce of regular workers with a contingent of as needed temps provides them flexibility while saving on payroll and benefits costs.

In the coming months, I will be writing more about this and providing you strategies so that you can deal with this new paradigm.

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Filed under Economy, Employee Relations, Leadership